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Blog posts tagged with 'Sight-reading'

Everyone Hates Singing

Everyone Hates Singing

 

Unless it’s in the shower or with their favourite CD – that’s different.

There’s loads of studies available to tell you why singing is good for you physically and mentally. It’s also not just good for your general playing, but also your sight-reading. But everyone always hates the singing element of the aural tests!

Every grade level there’s a singing element – a lot say this isn’t fair and I really can understand. But singing is so good for you. It works on your ear, your memory and if you can sing what you have heard it’s a great to show that your brain has understood and can externalise sounds.

For the early grades it’s just copying sounds and repeating them, then as the grades progress they do get harder. If you want help with the singing element of the aural tests – check out my youtube channel for some handy videos.

Once you get to grade four that’s when the singing takes on a new edge with: sight-singing

What is sight-singing?

Sight-singing is basically singing something you’ve not seen before and pitching it out loud rather than using an instrument to find the notes (unless you’re a singer).

Just from a confidence point of view you will be more likely to play a new piece better if you know how it goes. And if you can sight-sing then you can hear how it goes before you play it!

You can start working on this at any level of your music experience and even if you’re not thinking about exams.

Start with something simple like just singing back a few notes that you hear, then increasing the length of the piece you copy. This will help you get used to singing and listening to the sound you make, as you will need to make sure it is the same as the original.

Then start by practising singing your scales and arpeggios -remember this is what music is built on.

Then pick a nice key and draw a few notes (unless you have a handy aural test book - grades 4-5 have good examples of this) on a piece of manuscript paper. Just work on the first 5 notes of the scale. Draw them, sing them, play them.

Like everything – it does just come down to practice.

 

How to Take the Nerves out of Nervous

 

How to take the Nerves out of Nervous

 

You’re sat in the waiting room. Your mouth’s gone dry. Legs are shaking. Palms are sweating. You feel sick and dizzy, your mind has gone blank. It can only be… time for your next music exam.

 

But it doesn’t have to be a horrible experience.

 

It can be easier said than done *but* nerves can be overcome… or at least they can become less of an issue.

 

No matter your age or level experience, nerves can really turn an exam into a really terrifying experience. But they don’t need to ruin it completely. I’m not saying you’ll ever really love your exams, and indeed if you really hate them I would ask whether they’re worth putting yourself through the stress. For why you shouldn’t do an exam maybe read this post

 

But if you’re determined to do exams but the nerves are something you want to tackle then read on!

 

There’s three things you need to remember about nerves:

 

Everyone feels nervous (yes they do – it’s not just you!)

Examiners know the difference between nervous mistakes and what’s just wrong

The worst thing that will happen is that you’ll feel nervous

 

For me I find exams a really nervous time – even when I’m just accompanying. But I do have quite a nervous disposition, so I find supermarkets at Christmas a stressful situation!

 

Being prepared can really help anxiety on the day. Don’t leave your scales to the last minute. Don’t just practice the aural with your teacher (find extra examples on youtube etc) and don’t neglect your sight-reading practice either.

 

Also embrace the fact that it won’t be perfect. You won’t get full marks in everything – it’s just not possible. There will always be more you could do on dynamics and articulation, the intonation can often be stronger… so don’t put the pressure on doing amazingly well. Just do your best – and that will be more than good enough.

 

There will always be an annoying bar or phrase, or even piece, that’s not quite as good as the rest. That’s fine. Over prepare on everything else and relax on the bit you’re not sure about – you might just surprise yourself.

 

BREATHE!

 

Deep breaths. Slow and steady. Breathing really can help calm nerves, or at least help your body regain a bit of control. Breathing too fast will only raise your level of anxiety, so do try slower breaths and take a moment before you start to play your first piece and in between the sections on your exam.

 

Embrace the nervous feeling.

 

The worst that will happen is that you will feel nervous.

 

You might feel sick, but you won’t be. You might be dizzy, but you won’t faint. Small sips of water will help your dry mouth, your hands won’t slip off the keys – but maybe just wipe them before you go in.

 

That’s all.

 

Breathe.

 

Embrace them.

 

It’s all just part of a performance. I would be more nervous if I wasn’t nervous (as weird as that sounds).

 

And you know what – the exam will be over in the blink of an eye and you will be wondering what you were so nervous about in the first place.

 

 

 

 

 

Exam Prep: What to do, what to do...

 

Exam Prep: What to do, what to do

 

Exam season is on us once more and once again – practice becomes that little bit less enjoyable and that little bit more fraught.

 

So – how do you prepare for an exam…

 

Well, the easiest thing to say is – you practice.

 

You do the same as you would in a normal lesson in a normal week in a normal moment of your life. Exams are easier if you make less of a big deal of them (easier said than done I know).

 

When you’re on the run up to the exam you really do need to make sure that you’re working on all elements of the exam – obvious I know, but I do know a lot of students that leave sight-reading and the aural tests practice to happen only during their lessons. And I also know many, many students who leave the scale practise until the last minute too!

 

DON’T!

 

Make all elements of the exam elements of a normal practice routine. They they will become something that you do, rather than something that only happens in exams (so therefore something to worry about).

 

DO:

 

Make your practice session a really effective one.

 

Warm up – long notes, dexterity exercises, octave jumps, articulation work, see how fast you can play, see if you can work over tricky jump sections without getting extra ‘blup’ notes in between.

 

Scales: Make sure you work on all of them (not just the ones you like – the tricky ones won’t get any easier!), make flash cards or just write their names on a piece of paper and pull them randomly out of a hat. Mess around with the articulation, add some rhythms… do you know the scales inside out and back to front?? (For more practice ideas see our Scale Blog Post)

 

Pieces: Don’t feel you need to practice all three *every* session – split them up over the week (maybe keep notes to remind yourself which you practised and when).

 

Sight-reading: Find an old piece, turn the book upside down. Play it backwards. Try a couple of lines of the other exam pieces. Just look at something new!! If you want a super sight-reading boost – check out the Horrible Sight-reading for Lovely People Course

 

Aural Tests: Don’t just leave it to the lesson time to practice. Ask your teacher for a list of what you need to work on. There’s loads of great aural test clips available on youtube! Including mine!

 

DON’T

 

Just play through your pieces. Play through once but then isolate the sections that need working on. Do slow practice to ensure your fingers know what they need to do. Start in the middle of the piece so your mind’s fresh for when you get to the challenging section. Be really, really fussy!!

 

DO

 

Remember to focus on your dynamics. Examiners love dynamics! Make them really, really obvious.

 

DON’T

 

Worry about the singing bit of the aural tests. It’s not worth stressing over – and remember everyone hates it, it’s not just you!

 

DO

 

Have a mock exam. Get your teacher to give you a practice exam so you know what to expect. Get a parent, grandparent, friend, partner, whoever to listen to you while you play. Get them to pretend to write things down as you play (as this is what usually makes people feel the most nervous about).

 

DON’T

 

Don’t forget – your scales, aural tests and sight-reading etc. are easy extra marks – they really can make the difference between the results you get. So do remember to practice them in your own time as well as your lesson time. (I know I said this a second ago – but it’s so important it needs mentioning twice!!).

 

DO:

 

Have fun – try and relax and enjoy it! It’ll be over before you know it!

 

Good luck!

 

Spring Clean Your Practise Regime

Spring Clean your Practise Regime

 

 

Ok – so maybe regime isn’t the right word. But with Spring (apparently) around the corner, now’s a great time to get yourself practising better.

 

Practise definitely is the word I want.

 

Are you practising? Or are you just playing?

 

There’s a huge difference between practising and playing. Playing is just blasting through it and accepting that there were mistakes, ignoring the fact that you forgot to dynamics (what dynamics?) and realising that you’re not technically playing the articulation as written. But that’s ok – you’ll do it on the next time you play it. Erm, nope – next time you play it you’ll probably do the same mistake, and then you’ll start to learn the mistakes which makes it even harder to correct.

 

Remember:

 

You’re practising so you can’t play it wrong. (Not practising to play it right).

 

It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been playing for, or how far advanced you are. You always need to practise and practise well. Think about how your teacher’s advised you to practise? Can’t remember? Could you ask them in the next lesson? Don’t have a teacher or need some tips now??

 

Then you’ve come to the right place. Here’s my advice to Spring Clean your Practise Regime:

 

1. Warm Up!

 

It doesn’t matter what instrument you play – always, always warm up. It gets your brain in gear, your fingers warmed up and your body more responsive too. And yes I know time is always of the essence… but there’s no point practising if you’re not going to do it properly. It’s worth while spending 5mins warming up, that way you’ll get more out of your time on your pieces.

 

Long notes, breathing exercises, dynamic work, scales, dexterity exercises, articulation exercises – there’s so many different ways to warm up. Alternate what you start with every time you practise. Or go for extreme practisingness – combine breathing with your scales and dynamic work…. Or scales and dynamics and articulation….

 

2. Perform The Piece

 

Now – I actually wrote Play Through The Piece when I first started this blog post. But actually this really isn’t what you want to do. When we play – I’m not sure we actually give it our fullest, most concentrated attention.

 

If we perform however…. that’s a different thing entirely.

 

Now – don’t worry I don’t mean you need to find a loved one, handy neighbour, parent or pet to sit in while you play. But do imagine that this is your one and only, exam based, concert situation chance to play it. (But without the nerves). Don’t let yourself repeat any sections if you make a mistake, keep going and aim to perform it to the best of your abilities.

 

3. Isolate the Difficult Bits

 

There will always be those annoying bits. Those fast runs, the weird chromatic bits, the bit with the leaps… and generally in the middle section. It might not be notes that catch you out, it might be rhythms, co-ordination, breathing or it might be that your brain just doesn’t like it. For whatever reason there will be bits you can’t play. Now this is where you need to make sure your Spring Clean Practise Regime comes in to play.

 

Isolate the section

Look to see what you need to do (and what you can’t do)

Play it slooooooooooooooooooooooowly (you can’t ever go too slow)

Play it slightly faster

Play the bar before and then the tricky bit.

Did it work? No? Go slooooooooooooooooowly again.

Do the bar before.

Try two bars before….

Go slightly faster.

Go a line before………..

 

The problem will never be with the bar you get stuck on. The problem will be with the messages that your brain sends just before you play that section. So in order to make sure the right message is sent – you need to go from before the mistake, not just on the mistake itself.

 

4. Keep notes!

I always keep a note pad close by when I’m practising. That way if I make a mistake or find an area that I’m not happy with I know to focus my practise from that point when I play again, rather than starting at the beginning.

5. Keep That Nagging Voice Quiet…

 

We all know that internal voice. The one that reminds you that you got that bit wrong last time, that you’re going too fast, that you missed the dynamics. Yeah, that one.

 

Focus on the positives of your playing. Don’t let your mind wander on to what if’s and what happened last time. Try and keep that inner voice quiet.

 

A great book to help silence that silly voice is ‘Inner Game of Music’ by Timothy Gallwey.

 

6. Sight-reading and New Fun Time!

 

Always keep your sight-reading skills up to speed by looking at something new every session. Whether you look at an actual sight-reading exercise or just a new short piece – anything new will help improve your reading.

 

And why not end your practise session with something fun. Whether it’s improvising, playing along to backing tacks or just a piece you really love – go for it!

 

After all – it’s supposed to be fun!

New Course - Horrible Sight-Reading for Lovely People

Horrible Sight Reading for Lovely People

 

Everyone (except me) hates sight-reading!

Or at least all of my students insist that this *must* be the case.

But sight-reading doesn’t have scary (or difficult) – it really does all boil down to practise. All sight-reading is – is just playing a new piece. And you do that every time you start something new…. Ok you might not do if with only a few seconds to practise and an examiner breathing down you neck… but seriously. Every time you turn the page you’re sight-reading.

So what’s the scary thing?

I guess it’s a quest into the unknown.

But its not unknown realms of weird not knowingness (if there is such a thing as that!).

Sight-reading is just recognition really.

It’s notes you (hopefully) know and rhythms you’ve seen before – but all perhaps mixed in a way you’ve not. But the elements are still all the same!

Our Horrible Sight-Reading for Lovely People course helps you break out of the sight-reading blindness and realise that you do recognise everything and that it’s never as scary as you think it might be.


Who is it for?

This course is for those who want to break away from thinking sight-reading is scary and want to learn to love it! (or just not hate it to pass an exam better)

Teachers this course is great for extra sight-reading sheets and is a good boost to those students who are perhaps lacking in confidence with their sight-reading ability.


How does it work?

Well done for getting this far in your boost to your sight-reading ability all you need to do now is decide how much of a boost you’d like to take on:

One week mini boost: £5 (and you can do this as many times as you feel you need!)

Two weeks big boost: £10

Four weeks super boost: £17


Simply click and order the course you’d like to sign up to!

 

If you enjoy your one week mini boost so much you can simply order another one week boost to follow it at a later date. Feel free to mini, big or super boost as many times as you need!


What will I get?

You will get three boost emails in the week for your sight-reading boost.

Boost 1: There’ll be a sheet of handy hints and tips to break down sight-reading into easier chunks, a rhythm work sheet and a super easy sight-reading sheet to break you in gently.

Boost 2: This sight-reading sheet will be of the level you’re working at.

Boost 3: This sight-reading sheet will definitely be horrible and above the level you need – this is because we truly believe the brain works better when it’s over stretched as it then relaxes back when it thinks it’s easier. (Reverse psychology and all that jazz!)

Each sight reading sheet will come with mp3 answers of how the tests ‘should’ have sounded like.

For grades 6,7 and 8 we will also include a more realistic performance of the sight-reading tests and hints to how to ‘blag it’ in an exam situation.

Rachael Forsyth has been teaching music and music theory for the last 13years and has a 100% pass rate for both practical and theory exams. She is a full time woodwind and piano tutor and teaching both classical and jazz music.


What level is it aimed at?

Currently our Horrible Sight-Reading for Lovely People course is available for grades initial and 1-5 (later grades still being prepared!). If you’re finding the sight-reading a seriously difficult thing to do then why not consider a mini boost (one week course) for the grade below to kick start your sight-reading journey.


Anything else I need to know?

Not really – but if you do have any questions please feel free to email us or get in touch via facebook or twitter!

@roorecordsmusic


How Duets Can Inspire Your Students

 How Duets Can Inspire Your Students?

 

Ahh… the duet point in any tuition book. How many teachers skip over these because they know most students dread to play them.

Although they can be difficult to do – duets actually can be really good for students in many ways and here’s just some of my favourite reasons.

Recorder DuetsIntonation! How many times do we get exam results through that moan about intonation? But in an exam situation students panic. Yes, they might be listening to the accompanist but are they listening to themselves? Duets are a fantastic way for students to work on their intonation as the sounds they hear need to blend that little bit closer. They’re also hearing the same sort of sounds (assuming you duet on the same instruments) so again it can really make them have to work out what sound is coming from them and what’s not.

Ensemble experience - Duets are a great introduction to ensemble playing – if they’re keen to join an orchestra or band, but aren’t sure what it feels like then duets can be great starting place.

Listening – You’ve got to listen to make duets work. Unlike being accompanied where the pianist will often work with the soloist to support their lines, duets really do need a sense of balance. The rhythms need to work together, the tone needs to blend, the dynamics need to match etc etc etc. So for the ear – again they’re a great work out!

Breathing – Although all students do remember the breathe when they’re playing (hopefully), duets can help them progress a bit further with their breathing. Because you’re playing together the natural result is that both players begin to breathe at the same time. So it becomes natural and organic, rather than prescribed four bar phrases.

Sight-reading – I know I keep going on about sight-reading (partly because I love it and it really isn’t as scary as students make out!) but duets can also be used to add a different angle to their sight-reading practise. Give them a minute to look over part one, count in and both play it from scratch. This would give them a real boost in the importance of making sure when they perform a sight-reading exercise that they stay in time and learn the importance of keeping going (and blagging it when they’re not sure!!)

Repertoire – There’s such a wide range of duet pieces out there that there is really a vault of untapped music ready to be played. They’re a brilliant filler if you need something extra from the tuition book. There’s always a great array of different styles and genres out there to explore.

So get out there and get them playing more duets!

Flute Duets