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Blog posts tagged with 'Composition'

First Steps Into Composition

 

First Steps into Composition

 

One of the main problems with composition is this pre-set idea that in order to compose you must be an advance musician or some sort of super creative type. Or that in order to write music you need a muse and be inspired by something … well inspiring.

 

But composition and teaching composition doesn’t need to start complicated, and indeed it can be included in lessons from a very early stage.

 

Composing is just slow improvisation – and students of all ages and ability levels usually enjoy making music up.

 

Where to Start

 

Creative composition can be quite a freeing exercise. Use a great picture of a story idea and just encourage students to make sounds and noises to represent what that picture means to them.

 

So for example if you have a picture of a stormy landscape:

 

Students might start with slow rain dripping noises, then build it up louder and faster to represent the rain. Then loud and crashing for thunder, with lightning flashes… for it to all quieten down and go back to the gentle rain drops again.

 

Writing it Down

 

You might remember he Begin with the Blues post I made and teaching composition can start in a very similar place.

 

Language is all around us and is something that students can relate to. So by using language as a basis for rhythms it makes writing melodies a lot more accessible.

 

A Title

 

Starting with a title is perfect as your students know what they’re describing.

 

A Story

 

Encourage students to start by writing a question down (this gets them to already write in even phrases) and then to write down the rhythm that goes with that small sentence. By saying the words out loud and clapping they will also be recognising the relationship between crotchet and quavers. (It’s quite helpful if you try and ensure that their sentence contains some easy words otherwise you’ll have some difficult rhythms to write down!)

 

It might be something as simple as:

 

What will you have for your tea today?

 

Once they have the rhythm for the first question, then all they need to do then is write an answer to that question. This also then gets their melody writing to not only be focused on working in phrases, but it starts them thinking how melodies work together and should also ensure that they end up the same length. I like to think about melodies about being organic, so the melody rows from the first phrase.

 

So you might end up with:

 

What will you have for your tea today? I’m having sausage and chips

 

When they have a sentence and the rhythms written down then it’s just giving them a series of notes to experiment.

 

As with teaching improvisation it’s often easier to start with fewer notes so they can write something that to them ‘makes sense’ rather than having too many notes to choose from.

 

Pentatonic scales are a brilliant resource for this – but any sequence of notes you fancy would work.

 

Encouraging students to start on the first note of the scale or sequence and ending on the same note at the end of the song also helps students find a melody that they find satisfactory.

 

Happy composing!

 

What to do with Sleeping Students....

What to do With Sleeping Students….

 

We all know the feeling…. It’s the last couple of weeks of term. The kids are tired, the teachers are tired. If it’s the summer term everyone’s too hot… if it’s the winter term then everyone’s full of cold.

 

So rather than dragging students through the same pieces they’ve been working on, but you know they won’t practice over the summer why not use the time to do something fun and something that works out their musical ear and brain in a different way.

 

You know yourself that if you’re tired you don’t work as well and that things are more of a chore – and it’s exactly the same for your students.

 

So here’s my go to end of term games:

 

  • Improvisation – so much fun, works on their listening skills and gets them working creatively too

  • Don’t Play This One Back – play or clap rhythms that the students have to copy – but they shouldn’t copy if if you clap the rhythm to the words Don’t Play This One Back

  • Beat the Clock – students have to say and play a series of notes against a time limit – usually I give 30 seconds then they have to beat the number of notes they said in the next round

  • Dictation – Can they write a rhythm or melody down that you play

  • Copy Me – Can they play a melody back – I usually start with one note then gradually increase the phrase (a bit like that annoying Bop It game!)

  • Spot the Difference – Play a piece of music and see if they can see what note / phrase was different

  • Speed Scales – how fast and accurately can they play their scales – who’s the fastest – student vs teacher

  • Speed Pieces – who can play a simple piece the fastest – student vs teacher

  • Creative Composition – writing a piece of music using a story – so not focusing on melody or harmony – just using sounds to create a musical landscape

  • Graphic Scores – if you’re doing some creative composition they might like to draw a grahic score to go with it

  • Long Note Competition

  • Musical Maths – Can they add the tied notes together

  • Musical Word Searches etc – There’s lots of theory based written games that you can find online that are great for the hot weather

  • Backwards Playing – Can they play their piece backwards?

  • Musical Hangman – This is my students favourite game – Write down a musical word for them to guess – but in order to be able to guess a letter of the word they have to do something musical – it might be say the name of some notes, say what key it’s in, clap the rhythm etc etc – then normal rules of hangman apply. (Needless to say this game does take the longest but it’s a great lesson filler and gets students thinking about all sorts of aspects of theory etc.) (And when we play this at Christmas I do get accused of cheating – I’m sorry but no – Sprouts is not a cheating word…. I just quite like to win!!)

 

Any fun games I’ve missed – why not add them in the comments!

 

Happy end of term!!!

New Year (Practise) Resolutions

 

Well it’s official we’re definitely into a new year! I don’t know about you but I enjoy the start of the new year to plan where I’d like to be at the end of it (those who know me well enough should know by now that I loooooooove a good list). Most people I know write resolutions of things like – get thinner, eat better, exercise more, join a gym… but quite a lot do let these resolutions slide.

I’d a bit believer that if you write it on a list – it will get done! There’s a great statistic that 90% of people will do 90% of a list!

So it’s January – write your list! If you want to eat better and feel better about yourself do it – but be specific. Join a gym isn’t a list item.

1. Sign up to the gym by 5th January

2. Go three times a week

3. Sign up for swimming lessons… they’re list items!

And you can do the same for practising, performing and anything else you want in your musical 2018 year.

Think specifics… is there one area that you know you need to work on…. Is it scales(!), is it breathing and breath control, is it sight reading, is it LH note reading, is it co-ordination, is it your dynamic range, is it intonation on the highest/lowest register. Have a think…. There is always something that we can work on and improve and progress as musicians.

You might also want to set yourself a musical challenge – maybe its finish your tuition book, do a grade, tackle a really difficult piece, perform in front of your family, learn to improvise, join an orchestra.... Again – let your head and your heart lead you! You’re only limited by your imagination!

I do get my students of all ages and abilities to have a think at the start of every term where they’d like to progress to. And at the start of the year it’s an even better time to focus on what you want.

 

Here’s my music goals for 2018:

 

1. Spend more time practising on the piano (three times a week)

2. Complete grade 3 cello exam by December

3. Go for teaching / performing diploma exam in the Summer

4. Compose something new every week

 

Whatever you do – have fun achieving it! Merry 2018 to everyone!!!