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Blog posts of '2018' 'April'

You've Gotta Take the Rough with the Smoooooooooth

A lot of practice was done this last week on slurring with our students.

Slurring can be tricky to get your head around when you first start learning - but then it can be just as hard to switch off again.

You do need to make sure that the slurring (and other articulation) is there as marked on the piece. If not you can alter the shape of the melody, style of the song and the sounds as a whole. It’s a bit like accidentally putting stress on a word you didn’t mean to and it upsetting somebody. That can be the difference!

You can easily put slurs into your scale practice to help with alternating with slurs and tongued notes.

This way your brain and tongue can co-ordinate without you having to think too much about notes, rhythms, rests, breathing etc etc

 

Why not play your scales like this:

 

Slurred in groups of 4

Slurred in groups of 2

Slurred in groups of 3

Slurred in groups of 5 (three and five groups will be difficult – our brains like even groups!)

Or alternate the slurring (S) and tonguing (T) like this:

 

S-S TT S-S TT S-S TT S-S TT

TT S-S TT S-S TT S-S TT S-S

T S-S T T S-S T T S-S T T S-S T

 

You can also then add in staccatos and accents. Maybe try writing a pattern down for you to see to help your brain remember!

You could even compose your own pieces and add some slurs and tongued notes on. Or even get a song that you know really well and add your own articulation on it. Just make sure you’re listening really carefully to make sure that you aren’t over extending the slurs and making them longer!

 

 

 

Spring Clean Your Practise Regime

Spring Clean your Practise Regime

 

 

Ok – so maybe regime isn’t the right word. But with Spring (apparently) around the corner, now’s a great time to get yourself practising better.

 

Practise definitely is the word I want.

 

Are you practising? Or are you just playing?

 

There’s a huge difference between practising and playing. Playing is just blasting through it and accepting that there were mistakes, ignoring the fact that you forgot to dynamics (what dynamics?) and realising that you’re not technically playing the articulation as written. But that’s ok – you’ll do it on the next time you play it. Erm, nope – next time you play it you’ll probably do the same mistake, and then you’ll start to learn the mistakes which makes it even harder to correct.

 

Remember:

 

You’re practising so you can’t play it wrong. (Not practising to play it right).

 

It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been playing for, or how far advanced you are. You always need to practise and practise well. Think about how your teacher’s advised you to practise? Can’t remember? Could you ask them in the next lesson? Don’t have a teacher or need some tips now??

 

Then you’ve come to the right place. Here’s my advice to Spring Clean your Practise Regime:

 

1. Warm Up!

 

It doesn’t matter what instrument you play – always, always warm up. It gets your brain in gear, your fingers warmed up and your body more responsive too. And yes I know time is always of the essence… but there’s no point practising if you’re not going to do it properly. It’s worth while spending 5mins warming up, that way you’ll get more out of your time on your pieces.

 

Long notes, breathing exercises, dynamic work, scales, dexterity exercises, articulation exercises – there’s so many different ways to warm up. Alternate what you start with every time you practise. Or go for extreme practisingness – combine breathing with your scales and dynamic work…. Or scales and dynamics and articulation….

 

2. Perform The Piece

 

Now – I actually wrote Play Through The Piece when I first started this blog post. But actually this really isn’t what you want to do. When we play – I’m not sure we actually give it our fullest, most concentrated attention.

 

If we perform however…. that’s a different thing entirely.

 

Now – don’t worry I don’t mean you need to find a loved one, handy neighbour, parent or pet to sit in while you play. But do imagine that this is your one and only, exam based, concert situation chance to play it. (But without the nerves). Don’t let yourself repeat any sections if you make a mistake, keep going and aim to perform it to the best of your abilities.

 

3. Isolate the Difficult Bits

 

There will always be those annoying bits. Those fast runs, the weird chromatic bits, the bit with the leaps… and generally in the middle section. It might not be notes that catch you out, it might be rhythms, co-ordination, breathing or it might be that your brain just doesn’t like it. For whatever reason there will be bits you can’t play. Now this is where you need to make sure your Spring Clean Practise Regime comes in to play.

 

Isolate the section

Look to see what you need to do (and what you can’t do)

Play it slooooooooooooooooooooooowly (you can’t ever go too slow)

Play it slightly faster

Play the bar before and then the tricky bit.

Did it work? No? Go slooooooooooooooooowly again.

Do the bar before.

Try two bars before….

Go slightly faster.

Go a line before………..

 

The problem will never be with the bar you get stuck on. The problem will be with the messages that your brain sends just before you play that section. So in order to make sure the right message is sent – you need to go from before the mistake, not just on the mistake itself.

 

4. Keep notes!

I always keep a note pad close by when I’m practising. That way if I make a mistake or find an area that I’m not happy with I know to focus my practise from that point when I play again, rather than starting at the beginning.

5. Keep That Nagging Voice Quiet…

 

We all know that internal voice. The one that reminds you that you got that bit wrong last time, that you’re going too fast, that you missed the dynamics. Yeah, that one.

 

Focus on the positives of your playing. Don’t let your mind wander on to what if’s and what happened last time. Try and keep that inner voice quiet.

 

A great book to help silence that silly voice is ‘Inner Game of Music’ by Timothy Gallwey.

 

6. Sight-reading and New Fun Time!

 

Always keep your sight-reading skills up to speed by looking at something new every session. Whether you look at an actual sight-reading exercise or just a new short piece – anything new will help improve your reading.

 

And why not end your practise session with something fun. Whether it’s improvising, playing along to backing tacks or just a piece you really love – go for it!

 

After all – it’s supposed to be fun!